Salvia microphylla 'Candleglow'

Salvia microphylla ‘Candleglow’

Salvia microphylla  ‘Candleglow’:is a small upright bushy shrub to 80 cm H with 2 toned flowers of cream and pink. Flowering  for most of the year.
Salvia microphylla 'Candleglow'
Salvia microphylla ‘Candleglow’

Salvia microphylla ‘Candleglow’ is a very attractive plant with it’s  pretty  cream and pink flowers.

Flowers: are a pretty two toned cream and pale pink typical microphylla  flower. Both most of the hood and the tube are pink with a cream tip with white hairs on the top of the hood . All of the bottom lobes are cream, the middle lobe is large, flared and slightly split.
Coming into flower in spring, it’ll continue to flower most of the year until trimmed. Very bee and insect  friendly.

Calyces: are green , ribbed with some colouring at the tip of each lobe. The flowers are held in pairs in a cluster at the end of the flowering stem slightly above the foliage to attract passing insects.

Having the flowers above the foliage allows the insects to enter the flower more freely than being obstructed by foliage.

Leaves: are long, oval, a flat dull mid green, veins and midribs showing clearly with small crenations along the margins.

Salvia microphylla ‘Candleglow’ is a very attractive addition to the garden adding  great colour variation  for a pastel coloured theme to a cottage type garden. It brightens and softens any dark corner of the garden. Grow with other mauves, soft blues and yellow perennials.

Plant in full sun either at the front of the bed or behind smaller darker leaf ground covers to show off the colouring of these lovely flowers. A tough, hardy plant for the summer heat  and winter cold, it will tolerating light frosts.

At the end of summer, when S. ‘Candleglow’ is looking a bit straggly and untidy, it’s time to trim off all the old flowering stems, cutting out any dead or twiggy stems and cut back to good green buds to allow new growth to regenerate the shrub for the next season.

Propagation: is usually by tip cuttings taken  from new growth in spring and summer.

 

Back to Varieties