Salvia 'Karla'

Salvia ‘Karla’

Salvia ‘Karla’ : is a small open bushy shrub 80cm -1mH with the palest pink semi tubular flowers in late winter/ spring for a sunny position.

Salvia 'Karla'
Salvia ‘Karla’

Salvia ‘Karla’ is possibly a cross between S. ‘Waverly’ and S. chiapensis.

Flowers: are semi tubular. They can either be white or a pale lilac pink colour. The hood is furry with soft hairs, this is almost the same size as the bottom lobes.
The middle lobe falls down with a slight split in the centre. A very pale beeline  is seen around the throat opening to guide the bees and insects into the flower.
Flowers are seen in late winter and spring, continuing through the summer. These are held on long stems above the foliage to attract passing insects. Small birds with long beaks are also attracted to these flowers.

Calyces: are primarily green with some colouring on the pointed tips on the exposed  sides. All lobes shiny and ribbed. These fall off when the flowers are finished leaving a flowering stem to be cut off.

Leaves: are a fresh grass green colour, broad lanceolate shape, shiny, veins clearly seen, with small crenations around the edges. Leaves appear in pairs along the stems.

Salvia ‘Karla’ is a small upright bushy shrub for the front of the border or just behind a low ground cover. It does well planted in groups of threes plants for a masses effect.

Plant in a sunny position that is protected from frost. ‘Karla’ does well planted at the base under a deciduous tree. grow with other pale coloured small shrubs and perennials – whites, pale blues and mauves.

When most of the flowers have finished, then tidy the shrub by cutting off any dead flowering stems, any dead or twiggy stems. Feed and mulch for winter warmth, then in spring when new growth appears, feed again and mulch to keep the root area cool during the hot dry summer season. ‘Karla’ does appreciate watering during the dry summer months.

Propagation: is by tip cuttings taken at most times of the year.

Not always available

 

 

 

Back to Varieties