Salvia azurea

Salvia azurea: is a herbaceous perennial with long thin stems of lineal grey/ green leaves and large smokey blue flowers in summer. 60cmH
Salvia azurea
Salvia azurea

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salvia azurea  is a perennial that likes a sunny position with other perennials.

Flowers : are  a smokey blue, the furry hood is small,  the bottom middle lobe is large and slightly divided, but the ends of the lobe folds around to touch the other two small lobes, making the whole flower seem as one.
There is a paler beeline around the throat to guide bees and other pollinating insects into the flower towards the nectar.
A number of flowers are held high along a green flower stem, just above the foliage to attract passing insects.

Calyces: are a grey/ blue colour, prominently ribbed with pointed individual lobes.

Leaves: are long and lineal, grey green in colour with very tiny crenations along the margins. The midrib is the only visible  vein along the leaf. Both surface s are smooth, the upper surface being almost velvety.

This  Salvia is herbaceous ( winter dormant). The  flowers appear in later spring through the summer and into  autumn, putting on a massed display  of blue before they begin to go down for winter.

The leafy stems grow quickly and  can become floppy, so by planting this Salvia among other perennials, they support and help to keep the stems upright.

This Salvia loves a sunny position with other pale pink, white and yellow perennials, especially if the ground has been composted and mulched to keep the root area cool during the hot summers. It is a hardy perennial for summer with other similar plants.

At the end of the flowering season, collect any seed before cutting down. Mark the crowns so they are not lost and mulch over the clumps to keep the area warm during winter. Use snail bait as the new shoots begin to appear in spring.

Propagation: is usually either from tip cuttings taken during the growing period or the clump is divided  whilst dormant.

Not always available

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